Could you work for this company?

Pop quiz! Identify the warning bells in this company overview:

“And we would like to talk to a very specific person. We would like to talk to you. We would like to talk to you because you see it all. You do not let the tunnel vision of tradition and convention prevent you from making the world a better place. You are bigger than that. You know that there is someplace else for you, someplace where you will be challenged to exceed your potential, where you will be recognized and rewarded for your contributions, someplace where your creativity can emerge. You are not willing to settle for a small life. And though you might not know it yet, you are not willing to settle for anything less than the expanded and amplified world of Daiichi Sankyo.”

Advertisements

18 thoughts on “Could you work for this company?

  1. The usual self-contradicting philosophy – they challenge tradition and convention by offering more tradition and convention: “challenged to exceed your potential, where you will be recognized and rewarded for your contributions”. Very conventional. Hoist By Our Own Petard R Us.

    Like

  2. Well, “we would like to talk to a specific person; we would like to talk to you” is baloney walking around on stilts. They’re saying this to the whole world, to a bunch of complete strangers who are reading their web page on the Internet. They _don’t_ want to talk to a specific person. They _don’t_ know you. They don’t know anything about you.

    I suppose that’s just part of that deceitful flattery. I feel patronized by it. My reaction is, “Just how dumb do you think I am to feel excited and pleased by the blatantly false statement that you want to talk to me, specifically?”

    But the thing is, if some real person that I thought well of actually were talking to me about working for the company, I’d probably brush off the nonsense on the web page, assuming that it wasn’t written by any of the real people I would be working with or for but rather by some stupid consulting firm that the company hired. So it could mean little about the company itself.

    Like

  3. “To exceed your potential” results in failure. Just ask those burdened with debt. They probably meant “expand,” which they used later.

    Globalism, careerism, and anti-traditionalism have a symbiotic relationship that is parasitic on most everything else.

    Like

  4. I will have to disagree with Lydia. Many companies spend considerable time, money and effort “creating a corporate culture”, or as I I like to call it, “brainwashing the employees.”

    My employer was recently purchased by another company, and yesterday we had a “welcome aboard” meeting with the regional president. We were introduced to the Company Philosophy (about 50 positive statements of what WE do, i.e. “We value and promote diversity because it is good and because it is good business.”) She told us she reads it out loud to herself every morning, to help get herself centered.

    Think about that. It’s become a religion analogue for her. It’s her morning offering. This company has spent literally millions promoting their so-called philosophy, and weeding out those who don’t accept it. In doing so, they have turned their executive ranks into a cult, that is perfectly able to excrete the load that Jeff cites above.

    BTW Any know of any openings for a Unix administrator with 25 years of experience?

    Like

  5. I absolutely believe you, Danby. I didn’t mean to imply that companies don’t believe this stuff. I was merely saying that _if_ I had personal contact with people in the company who just seemed normal and didn’t seem to be saying all the nonsense on the web site, I might conclude that the nonsense on the web site didn’t represent the corporate culture. But I’m absolutely sure there are companies that have “corporate culture” as a religion substitute. That story of the regional president is big-time creepy and oh-so-believable. Even to someone like me who is just guessing about this stuff.

    Like

  6. I can relate to Danby’s story and have even quit a good paying job where the corporate atmosphere was similarly toxic. A substitute religion is exactly what these companies demand. I just don’t know where, in corporate America, it is possible to get away from this. Rest assured that only “players” get promoted and retained.

    The last such company I worked for hired a consulting firm that essentially instructed them to radically change their procedures periodically so as to eliminate those within the organization who are resistant to change. The point was to institutionalize perpetual revolution, so that no one ever becomes competent enough to become irreplacable.

    Danby, I’ll keep my eyes and ears open for Unix administrator jobs.

    Like

  7. Sounds a little like that monologue Mr. Potter gave to George Bailey, in Potter’s office at the bank, when he was trying to buy him off…

    Yes! I also thought of Homer Simpson when he went to work for Globex run by evil overlord Scorpio

    Like

  8. The last such company I worked for hired a consulting firm that essentially instructed them to radically change their procedures periodically so as to eliminate those within the organization who are resistant to change. The point was to institutionalize perpetual revolution, so that no one ever becomes competent enough to become irreplacable.

    That’s right. Liquidity is just as important as fundamental value, and that is a perfectly rational result of how our system works. I keep telling people that, but it is a tough thing to grasp.

    I might take the job of CEO and get rid of all this idiocy, if I thought doing so were feasible, just for the principle of the thing. Hard to imagine taking any other job there except in a case of hardship, where taking the job would be a penance.

    Like

  9. I realize this will sound really fundy, but thinking about that woman president Danby told about: That lady needs a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. I mean, talk about a God-shaped vacuum in the heart of man.

    I wonder if she does her “centering” exercise, reading these PC bits of corporate culture-ese, sitting in a yoga position.

    Like

  10. Danby,

    I’ll keep an ear and an eye out. Ann Arbor’s traditionally had a few companies who do hire grizzled Unix veterans, but times are tough here, too, and my information isn’t all current. Feel free to email if you’d like to discuss details.

    peace,
    Zach

    Like

  11. Kevin:“To exceed your potential” results in failure.

    Actually, I don’t think it’s logically possible to exceed one’s potential. Because if I think my potential is (e.g.) a score of 95, but I score 97, then my initial estimate of my potential was simply mistaken and my real potential was at least 97.

    Therefore, my first question to this employer would be: “When are you going to hire better translators?”

    And, by the way, Danby, I have found that Taiwan is a place with many opportunities. One might have to get one’s bearings by studying the language and teaching English for a while, but there are more opportunities in Taiwan than one might think.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s