Things that don’t bother me – II

It’s time for another “things that don’t bother me” post (see first post here):

1. McCain-Palin voters
2. The bailout
3. John Birch Society
4. Birkenstocks
5. Lew Rockwell
6. Breastfeeding in public (discreetly)
7. Electric cars
8. Zippy Catholic
9. Trader Joe’s
10. Nationalization of banks
11. League of the South
12. Jim Curley’s humor
13. Non-mavericks
14. Quiche
15. Men who chew tobacco
16. Partisans
17. Dale Price’s sports obsessions
18. Feeneyites
19. Garrison Keillor
20. Falangists
21. Girly-girls
22. Green tea
23. Authoritarianism
24. Gated communities
25. The smell of a dairy herd
26. Pack-rats
27. Poor spellers
28. Trial lawyers
29. Unmowed lawns
30. Women who call me “hon” and “sweety”
31. Ivory towers (and the people who live in them)
32. Gruff priests
33. TSO’s vacation notes
34. Most forms of “nepotism”
35. Most forms of “conflict of interest”
36. Raw milk fanatics
37. Pasteurization
38. Public TV and radio
39. Flea markets
40. Elevator music

Please feel free to add your own …

9 thoughts on “Things that don’t bother me – II

  1. Enbrethiliel:

    Yes, really! I’d be happy to explain it. The banks in the United States have long been a de facto monopoly controlled by userers, thieves, and swindlers. Transferring ownership to the government can hardly be any worse, and there is at least a chance that, through congressional control, the banks might be a little more accountable to the common good.

    Second, there are some things that ought not be privatized. Oxygen, for example. We all need to breathe, wherever we are, whether we can pay for it or not. None of us can produce enough oxygen to live on our own. Banks are a similar necessity, and the private sector has not proven to be a good and just steward. In the modern economy banks are a virtual monopoly by necessity. It is impossible for 99.9999 percent of the population to even dream of opening a bank.

    What about food? you might ask. Isn’t food also a necessity for all? Doesn’t my argument also, by extension, call for the nationalization of agriculture? Far from it! Food is naturally a local thing, and a private thing, and lends itself most naturally to private ownership and the principle of subsidiarity. Anyone with dirt can grow a little food: none of us, practically speaking, can open a bank in the current milieu.

    That said, I would prefer a private system, if it could be demonstrated to work. Maybe the private banking system can yet be saved. So it isn’t that I’m an advocate for nationalizing banks, but only that the idea itself doesn’t much bother me.

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  2. Second, there are some things that ought not be privatized. Oxygen, for example. We all need to breathe, wherever we are, whether we can pay for it or not. None of us can produce enough oxygen to live on our own.

    Have you been watching Spaceballs? :)

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  3. Ok, that was really funny. Spaceballs came up tonight when my friend and I were making Halloween/All Saints Day costumes. Right now, we have St. Dominic, St. Rose of Lima, St. Francis of Assisi, and St. Brendan. The latter two are wearing great big hooded brown felt robes. They look great, and we were making the hoods. Then we told the kids how very many things they could be in those cool robes, like Jedi and elves, and then something from Spaceballs. And then we got to talking about “Barf” the dog, and it just got too silly from there. I guess it’s time to watch it. Don’t think it’s kid material, but the adults need to watch something brainless once in a while or we’ll take ourselves too seriously.

    Jeff, I am surprised none of those things bother you, and I commend you for thinking about what doesn’t bother you rather than what does, because I’m not sure if I’d come up with such a great list. Maybe I should try.

    :)

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