New Sherwood

Amazing

How to play nine chess masters simultaneously … and win.

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August 7, 2008 - Posted by | Uncategorized

4 Comments »

  1. Before we watched the video, my husband told me how he got the plus score against the nine guys, and it correlated exactly with the explanation he gave himself. We don’t know how he did the prediction of the number of pieces left at the end. But the other trick is evidently already pretty well-known among chess players.

    Hubby said, “If I want to beat grandmasters, I’ll do it myself.”

    He has done so from time to time at blitz play (which is somewhat easier for a non-grandmaster player to do), but not simultaneously!

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    Comment by Lydia | August 7, 2008 | Reply

  2. Your husband sounds like quite an accomplished player! A bit scary, even. But now this raises the question: if the trick is well-known among chess players, how is it possible that these 9 masters had never heard of it – or didn’t figure it out themselves? Maybe the whole thing was a set up …

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    Comment by Jeff Culbreath | August 8, 2008 | Reply

  3. I don’t think they were all that surprised. And they surely got paid. Chess isn’t exactly a high-paying business unless you are way, way, way at the top. Even good players, if they wish to make a living off of chess, usually do so by teaching. Didn’t you see how they said, “It suddenly seemed like I was playing a grand master”? Wink, wink. They knew, or most of them did. I’d say, for sure. That doesn’t mean they didn’t play hard. But I think they figured pretty early on what was going on. For example, a simul where this isn’t going on would normally be played with all the players in a row, and the person giving the simul would not go away and find out what someone else played before coming back and responding.

    I think the amazement over the numbers in the envelope was probably genuine, though.

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    Comment by Lydia | August 8, 2008 | Reply

  4. Hmmm, can’t say I approve of the way they put this together. It almost spoils it, as the entertainment value was primarily in the element of surprise. Anyway, a clever trick!

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    Comment by Jeff Culbreath | August 8, 2008 | Reply


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